GRCh38 · COSMIC v92

Summary

This section shows a summary for the selected study (COSU identifier) or publication (COSP identifier). Studies may have been performed by the Sanger Institute Cancer Genome Project, or imported from the ICGC/TCGA. You can see more information on the help pages.

Reference
Genomic landscape of high-grade meningiomas.
Paper ID
COSP43982
Authors
Bi WL, Greenwald NF, Abedalthagafi M, Wala J, Gibson WJ, Agarwalla PK, Horowitz P, Schumacher SE, Esaulova E, Mei Y, Chevalier A, Ducar M, Thorner AR, van Hummelen P, Stemmer-Rachamimov A, Artyomov M, Al-Mefty O, Dunn GP, Santagata S, Dunn IF and Beroukhim R
Affiliation
Center for Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery, Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
Journal
NPJ genomic medicine, 2017;2
ISSN: 2056-7944
PMID: 28713588 (view at PubMed or Europe PMC)
Abstract
High-grade meningiomas frequently recur and are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. To determine the factors that promote the development and evolution of these tumors, we analyzed the genomes of 134 high-grade meningiomas and compared this information with data from 587 previously published meningiomas. High-grade meningiomas had a higher mutation burden than low-grade meningiomas but did not harbor any statistically significant mutated genes aside from NF2. High-grade meningiomas also possessed significantly elevated rates of chromosomal gains and losses, especially among tumors with monosomy 22. Meningiomas previously treated with adjuvant radiation had significantly more copy number alterations than radiation-induced or radiation-naïve meningiomas. Across serial recurrences, genomic disruption preceded the emergence of nearly all mutations, remained largely uniform across time, and when present in low-grade meningiomas, correlated with subsequent progression to a higher grade. In contrast to the largely stable copy number alterations, mutations were strikingly heterogeneous across tumor recurrences, likely due to extensive geographic heterogeneity in the primary tumor. While high-grade meningiomas harbored significantly fewer overtly targetable alterations than low-grade meningiomas, they contained numerous mutations that are predicted to be neoantigens, suggesting that immunologic targeting may be of therapeutic value.
Paper Status
Curated