GRCh38 · COSMIC v92

Summary

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Reference
Identification of Molecular Pathway Aberrations in Uterine Serous Carcinoma by Genome-wide Analyses.
Paper ID
COSP29619
Authors
Kuhn E, Wu RC, Guan B, Wu G, Zhang J, Wang Y, Song L, Yuan X, Wei L, Roden RB, Kuo KT, Nakayama K, Clarke B, Shaw P, Olvera N, Kurman RJ, Levine DA, Wang TL and Shih IM
Affiliation
Affiliations of Authors:Departments of Pathology, Oncology, and Gynecology/Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (EK, R-CW, BG, RBR, RJK, T-LW, I-MS); St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (GW, JZ, LW); Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA (YW, LS, XY); Department of Pathology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Medical College, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (K-TK); Shimane University, Japan (KN); Department of Pathology, Toronto Health Care system, Toronto, ON, Canada (BC, PS); Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan (R-CW); Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (NO, DAL).
Journal
Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 2012
ISSN: 1460-2105
PMID: 22923510 (view at PubMed or Europe PMC)
Abstract
BackgroundUterine cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in women, and uterine serous carcinoma is the most aggressive subtype. However, the molecular pathogenesis of uterine serous carcinoma is largely unknown. We analyzed the genomes of uterine serous carcinoma samples to better understand the molecular genetic characteristics of this cancer. MethodsWhole-exome sequencing was performed on 10 uterine serous carcinomas and the matched normal blood or tissue samples. Somatically acquired sequence mutations were further verified by Sanger sequencing. The most frequent molecular genetic changes were further validated by Sanger sequencing in 66 additional uterine serous carcinomas and in nine serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinomas (the preinvasive precursor of uterine serous carcinoma) that were isolated by laser capture microdissection. In addition, gene copy number was characterized by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays in 23 uterine serous carcinomas, including 10 that were subjected to whole-exome sequencing. ResultsWe found frequent somatic mutations in TP53 (81.6%), PIK3CA (23.7%), FBXW7 (19.7%), and PPP2R1A (18.4%) among the 76 uterine serous carcinomas examined. All nine serous carcinomas that had an associated serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma had concordant PIK3CA, PPP2R1A, and TP53 mutation status between uterine serous carcinoma and the concurrent serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma component. DNA copy number analysis revealed frequent genomic amplification of the CCNE1 locus (which encodes cyclin E, a known substrate of FBXW7) and deletion of the FBXW7 locus. Among 23 uterine serous carcinomas that were subjected to SNP array analysis, seven tumors with FBXW7 mutations (four tumors with point mutations, three tumors with hemizygous deletions) did not have CCNE1 amplification, and 13 (57%) tumors had either a molecular genetic alteration in FBXW7 or CCNE1 amplification. Nearly half of these uterine serous carcinomas (48%) harbored PIK3CA mutation and/or PIK3CA amplification. ConclusionMolecular genetic aberrations involving the p53, cyclin E-FBXW7, and PI3K pathways represent major mechanisms in the development of uterine serous carcinoma.
Paper Status
Curated