GRCh38 · COSMIC v94

Summary

This section shows a summary for the selected study (COSU identifier) or publication (COSP identifier). Studies may have been performed by the Sanger Institute Cancer Genome Project, or imported from the ICGC/TCGA. You can see more information on the help pages.

Reference
Genome sequencing identifies a basis for everolimus sensitivity.
Paper ID
COSP31241
Authors
Iyer G, Hanrahan AJ, Milowsky MI, Al-Ahmadie H, Scott SN, Janakiraman M, Pirun M, Sander C, Socci ND, Ostrovnaya I, Viale A, Heguy A, Peng L, Chan TA, Bochner B, Bajorin DF, Berger MF, Taylor BS and Solit DB
Affiliation
Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA.
Journal
Science (New York, N.Y.), 2012;338(6104):221
ISSN: 1095-9203
PMID: 22923433 (view at PubMed or Europe PMC)
Abstract
Cancer drugs often induce dramatic responses in a small minority of patients. We used whole-genome sequencing to investigate the genetic basis of a durable remission of metastatic bladder cancer in a patient treated with everolimus, a drug that inhibits the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling pathway. Among the somatic mutations was a loss-of-function mutation in TSC1 (tuberous sclerosis complex 1), a regulator of mTOR pathway activation. Targeted sequencing revealed TSC1 mutations in about 8% of 109 additional bladder cancers examined, and TSC1 mutation correlated with everolimus sensitivity. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using whole-genome sequencing in the clinical setting to identify previously occult biomarkers of drug sensitivity that can aid in the identification of patients most likely to respond to targeted anticancer drugs.
Paper Status
Curated