Cancer Gene Census

The cancer Gene Census is an ongoing effort to catalogue those genes for which mutations have been causally implicated in cancer.

The table below is generated from a working list of known cancer genes. The list has been annotated with information concerning chromosomal location, tumour types in which mutations are found, classes of mutation that contribute to oncogenesis and other genetic properties.

The table columns are as follows:

  1. Gene Symbol
  2. Name – descriptive name of the gene
  3. Entrez Gene ID – The ID links to the Entrez website
  4. Genome Location – GRCh38 location of the gene, with links to the genome browser and Ensembl
  5. Tier – indicates to which tier of the Cancer Gene Census the gene belongs
  6. Hallmark – indicates if a functional annotation for the gene is available and provides a link to the gene’s hallmarks-of-cancer page
  7. Chr Band – chromosome (1-22, X or Y), arm (p or q) and cytogenic band
  8. Somatic – if yes, somatic mutations have been detected
  9. Germline – if yes, germline mutations have been detected
  10. Tumour types (somatic) – somatic mutations in the gene are associated with the following diseases (see abbreviations tab)
  11. Tumour types (germline) – germline mutations in the gene are associated with the following diseases (see abbreviations tab)
  12. Cancer Syndrome – syndrome associated with germline mutation
  13. Tissue type – (see abbreviations tab)
  14. Molecular Genetics – (see abbreviations tab)
  15. Role in Canceroncogene: hyperactivity of the gene drives the transformation; TSG: loss of gene function drives the transformation. Some genes can play either of these roles depending on cancer type. Fusion: the gene is known to be involved in oncogenic fusions.
  16. Mutation Types – (see abbreviations tab)
  17. Translocation partner – gene symbol of fusion partner
  18. Other Germline Mut – other germline mutations not implicated in cancer
  19. Other Syndrome – other non-cancerous syndrome
  20. Synonyms – alternative names for the gene

Cancer Gene Census - Breakdown

These tables are generated from a working list of known cancer genes. The list has been annotated with information concerning chromosomal location, tumour types in which mutations are found, classes of mutation that contribute to oncogenesis and other genetic properties. We have sorted the data in a number of ways to list subsets of cancer genes with similar features. However, we would recommend that those wishing to scrutinise the list in detail should download it in its entirety from ten table in the 'Census' tab.

These tables can be searched, sorted or exported in csv or tsv formats.

Cancer Gene Census - Abbreviations

Glossary Terms

A
Amplification;
AEL
Acute eosinophilic leukemia;
AL
Acute leukemia;
ALCL
Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma;
ALL
Acute lymphocytic leukemia;
AML
Acute myelogenous leukemia;
AML*
Acute myelogenous leukemia (primarily treatment associated);
APL
Acute promyelocytic leukemia;
B-ALL
B-cell acute lymphocytic leukaemia;
B-CLL
B-cell Lymphocytic leukemia;
B-NHL
B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma;
CLL
Chronic lymphatic leukemia;
CML
Chronic myeloid leukemia;
CMML
Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia;
CNS
Central nervous system;
D
Large deletion;
DFSP
Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans;
DLBL
Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma;
DLCL
Diffuse large-cell lymphoma;
Dom
Dominant;
E
Epithelial;
F
Frameshift;
GIST
Gastrointestinal stromal tumour;
JMML
Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia;
L
Leukaemia/lymphoma;
M
Mesenchymal;
MALT
Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma;
MDS
Myelodysplastic syndrome;
Mis
Missense;
MLCLS
Mediastinal large cell lymphoma with sclerosis;
MM
Multiple myeloma;
MPD
Myeloproliferative disorder;
N
Nonsense;
NHL
Non-Hodgkin lymphoma;
NK/T
Natural killer T cell;
NSCLC
Non small cell lung cancer;
O
Other;
PMBL
Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma;
pre-B All
Pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia;
Rec
Recesive;
S
Splice site;
T
Translocation;
T-ALL
T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia;
T-CLL
T-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia;
TGCT
Testicular germ cell tumour;
T-PLL
T cell prolymphocytic leukaemia;

Hallmark

Based on the concept defined by D. Hanahan and R. A. Weinberg, COSMIC, in collaboration with Open Targets, integrates functional descriptions focused on Hallmarks of Cancer into the Cancer Gene Census. Hallmark pages visually explain the role of a gene in cancer by highlighting, which of the classic behaviours are displayed by the gene product and whether they are promoted or suppressed.

The 'switch view' toggle button allows to change the view between the hallmark ring and a table.

Descriptions include the role of cancer genes in 10 hallmarks of cancer as well as in cell division, differentiation, epigenetic regulation and senescence.

A concise overview with associated references is displayed in a panel on the right. References can be accessed directly for first hand verification and further investigation.

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